RAGDOLL parade

Apr 24

sabelmouse:

Fighting diseases is what the immune system was designed to do, vaccines injected straight into the body so that every particle of it triggers inflammation, often encephalitis, and autoimmune reactions, confuse and weaken it.

I’m deeply puzzled by how a vaccine injected just under the skin, into the muscle or taken orally*, is manifestly different (as far as the immune system is concerned) from an infection transmitted by or into a scratch or cut, or absorbed into the body via the soft membranes in the ear, nose or throat (including mouth)?*Not into the bloodstream, they don’t do that.

sabelmouse:

Fighting diseases is what the immune system was designed to do, vaccines injected straight into the body so that every particle of it triggers inflammation, often encephalitis, and autoimmune reactions, confuse and weaken it.

I’m deeply puzzled by how a vaccine injected just under the skin, into the muscle or taken orally*, is manifestly different (as far as the immune system is concerned) from an infection transmitted by or into a scratch or cut, or absorbed into the body via the soft membranes in the ear, nose or throat (including mouth)?

*Not into the bloodstream, they don’t do that.

Shane Jones - what do we think?

Bad news for Labour or good-riddance?

Was he pushed, or did he jump?

Was McCully just easing a thorn from National’s side?

Will Labour Green relations improve now?

When he (inevitably) returns to politics, will he join National or NZ First?

Will this have any impact on Labour heading into the election?

(Source: tldrwikipedia, via sex-drugs-and-electoral-rolls)

Wide-hipped women more likely to be promiscuous - study - Life & Style - NZ Herald News -

Er. No. Try again.

Surely, it’s more likely that a cultural assumption (now nicely reinforced by this study) regarding sexiness and sexuality, has lead to a number of self-fulfilling biases. For example, perhaps the women in this study are simply propositioned more often, because perhaps men are more likely to see them as sexual objects and therefore consider them not worthy for dating, just screwing? I really don’t know, but you can’t do a study like this without at least talking about cultural constructs and social expectations/biases.

According to this, either women are total automatons responding unthinkingly to hormonal messages without any agency or intent, or women are wholly rational all of the time & never just get horny, but rather carefully consider each potential sexual encounter in relation to their own hip-to-waist ratio (which begs the question of what additional factors are tallied up here, and do they carry a tape measure with them?).

Notwithstanding the above, my mother just pointed out that she has ‘child bearing hips’ and had two emergency cesareans, followed by a planned third cesar for an, er, unplanned third pregnancy she’d been told not to have because two emergency cesars already (yeah, that was me…). So, yeah, whatever.

[video]

Apr 23

Shane Jones Standing Down -

Shane Jones is stepping down before the election to take a job as Pacific Economic Ambassador, for which he was ‘shoulder-tapped’ by Foreign Minister (& Nat.) Murray McCully, raising all sorts of questions.

It does seem a little cosy, especially after it was revealed that Hekia Parata’s husband helped fund his bid for the Labour leadership. It all goes to reinforce the impression, that after all, he’s just a closet Tory.

Many pundits are claiming that this is terrible for Labour, & sure, he’s a heavy hitter, but he too often bats for the wrong team. Labour will be better off without him weighting them down and causing that distinct rightward list that keeps them going in circles, and gives the appearance that they are, if not rudderless, at least disorientated.

[video]

america-wakiewakie:

World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera
Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.
In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.
It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.
The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.
But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.
In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

america-wakiewakie:

World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera

Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.

In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.

It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.

The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.

But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.

In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

(via sabelmouse)

Apr 22

(Source: iguanamouth, via dakotapuma)

“You can’t say “I don’t do politics”, because silence is a political statement.” — Tariq Ramadan (via slightlybemused)

(Source: uniteforpalestine, via sex-drugs-and-electoral-rolls)